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    Oysters_oil_5

    Fungus (like mushrooms) can be used in soils to feed on and clean up toxic chemicals / various neurotoxins.

    From a press release by the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research:

    Because there is often a lot of traffic on the 'fungal highway’, the bacteria may come into close contact with one another, exchanging genetic material in the process. "It’s similar to the transmission of cold germs on a packed train," explains environmental microbiologist Dr. Lukas Y. Wick. "But unlike a cold, the new genes are usually an asset to the soil bacteria. They enable them to adapt better to different environmental conditions." Depending on the genes they receive through horizontal gene transfer, they may be able to adapt to new environmental conditions or access food sources which they were previously unable to exploit. For example, this might include the pollutants toluene or benzene contained in oil and gasoline, which to bacteria with the right genetic makeup are not only not harmful but actually very tasty food. So the passing on of this ability to other bacterial groups can be very advantageous in terms of the degradation of soil pollutants.

    Image courtesy of: http://www.fungi.com/blog/items/the-petroleum-problem.html

    Tag(s) toxins, environmental remediation, mushrooms
    Added 6 months ago view
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    Seawaterbattery

    Nanotechnology scientists are working on a sodium-oxygen, seawater battery

    a promising alternative to Lithium

    Research into battery improvements has traditionally focused on Lithium as a necessary component. As a 2015 Nature report states:

    "... Rechargeable metal–oxygen batteries are very attractive owing to their reliance on molecular oxygen, which forms oxides on discharge that decompose reversibly on charge. Much focus has been directed at aprotic Li–O2 cells, but the aprotic Na–O2 system is of equal interest because of its better reversibility."

    Indeed, the other problem with Lithium is that as a rare earth element, it can be increasingly expensive. It also has a relatively small window when it comes to operational safety.

    Which brings us to nanotechnology-based options that use seawater as the catholyte — where "catholyte" is a fancy way of saying an cathode + electrolyte combined.

    From a recent release of the ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces publication:

    "In batteries, the electrolyte is the component that allows an electrical charge to flow between the cathode and anode. A constant flow of seawater into and out of the battery provides the sodium ions and water responsible for producing a charge. The reactions have been sluggish, however, so the researchers wanted to find a way to speed them up."

    And the scientists briefly summarize their method:

    "We applied porous cobalt manganese oxide (CMO) nanocubes as the cathode electrocatalyst in rechargeable seawater batteries, which are a hybrid-type Na–air battery with an open-structured cathode and a seawater catholyte. The porous CMO nanocubes were synthesized by the pyrolysis of a Prussian blue analogue, Mn3[Co(CN)6]2·nH2O, during air-annealing, which generated numerous pores between the final spinel-type CMO nanoparticles. The porous CMO electrocatalyst improved the redox reactions, such as the oxygen evolution/reduction reactions, at the cathode in the seawater batteries. "

    Source source Tag(s) nanotech, batteries
    Added 7 months ago view
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    Cliff-house-design-eco-friendly-12

    This is a recycled house.

    Look at what you can do when you deconstruct and reconstruct.

    Intended to inspire home owners and designers to think outside the box, this LEED Platinum home is a deconstruction and reconstruction of an existing house, with ''80% of its materials being recycled/reused''.

    Eco-sustainable features include geothermal and photovoltaic systems, solar hot water and advanced heat-recovery technologies, all contributing to the reduction of energy consumption by 70%. Rainwater recycling provides for irrigation of the native plantings in the yard and rooftop garden. by

    Designed by Coates Design, a Seattle architecture firm: http://coatesdesign.com/

    Source source Tag(s) deconstruction, reconstruction, LEED house, recycled house
    Added 8 months ago view
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    Sell-fsbo-xfr-title

    How to transfer title in an FSBO

    Tag(s)
    Added 9 months ago view
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    Greener-hospitals-infographic

    Architect sustainability into a Hospital.

    Tag(s) architecture, passive design
    Added 9 months ago view
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    Hypersolar is a company working on creating a feasible hydrogen generator using nothing more than sunlight and any source of water...

    Imagine a generator that you can have in your back yard that runs NOT on dangerous gas cans of diesel, but on water... even dirty, gutter water! Even stale pond water! The prototype shown in the video uses water from the Salton Sea, which is known to be full of hazardous agricultural runoff.

    Here they have a working "prototype" with some expensive materials as part of the cells. They believe they can manufacture these less expensively.

    Watch the video and read why I think this company is the real thing.

    Things that make me believe this company is not out to scam anybody:

    -- Its founder is a dedicated scientist, with published academic research.

    -- Company now has a Highly-competent CTO

    -- It has an academic on board as a scientific advisor.

    -- It has an ongoing research agreement / relationship with the University of Iowa

    -- Continuous improvement in bringing down the cost of doing this on a large scale.

    This is a small team, and is currently a small-cap stock. However, we NEED these little ventures, because that is where breakthroughs happen. I have full confidence in the ability of the team to deliver value to its investors.

    Hypersolar IS a public company, and if you believe in the future of innovations like this, you can invest in HYSR at Tradeking. New investors, please sign up with this link: http://bit.ly/2dAQrUy

    Source source Tag(s) energy, solar, water, hydrogen
    Added 9 months ago view
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    Smart-cities-infrastructure

    Portland to participate in Whitehouse's Smart Cities Initiative

    80 million investment to build smarter cities. There are some endeavors that are simply too much for any one city to take on by itself.

    NIST’s Global City Teams Challenge is establishing multi-team super-clusters to take on grand challenges too big for any single city team to tackle. Examples include multi-city resilience to large-scale natural disasters, intelligent transportation systems that work in any city, and regional air quality improvements through coordinated local action. This initiative brings together groups of communities formed around lead cities—Portland, Oregon; Atlanta, Georgia; Newport News, Virginia; Columbus, Ohio; Bellevue, Washington; Kansas City, Kansas; and Kansas City, Missouri—to work with NIST and its collaborators, including DOT, DHS Science and Technology Directorate, NSF, the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration, the International Trade Administration, the Economic Development Administration, IBM, AT&T, CH2M, Verizon, Qualcomm Intelligent Solutions, Intel, US Ignite, and Urban-X, to develop ‘blueprints’ for shared solutions that will be collaboratively implemented in multiple cities and communities.

    NIST is announcing $350,000 in four new grants enabling 11 cities and communities to work together on innovative smart city solutions. The Replicable Smart City Technologies grants to teams of communities led by Newport News, Virginia; Bellevue, Washington; Montgomery County, Maryland; and Portland, Oregon focus on the development and deployment of inter-operable technologies to address important public concerns regarding air pollution, flood prediction, rapid emergency response, and improved citizen services through inter-operable smart city solutions that can be implemented by communities of all types and sizes.

    Source source Tag(s) urban planning, green tech, city design
    Added 9 months ago view
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    Stab-lok

    Electrical hazards in homes in the Northwest are rampant, due to a specific company's product .... these are especially common in Oregon and Washington.

    Federal Pacific Electric breaker box.

    "According to a report, some Federal Pacific Electric panels failed to operate properly nearly 60% of the time in the event of a power surge. The homeowner had no way of knowing that too many electrical devices were plugged into one room. The devices required more electricity than the circuit could provide. “The wiring got hot enough to fry an egg,” the electrician reported. Normally, the circuit breakers should trip to cut off the electricity and prevent a fire. The Federal Pacific Electric breakers did not operate properly, resulting in two circuit breakers and a bus bar being burned."

    Source source Tag(s) safety
    Added 9 months ago view
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