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Native Art Collectives receiving some supplies.

Dismantle what doesn't work.

Donate something to the arts.

REPURPOSE, RECYCLE, ETC.

No whitewashing these trees.

Colonist cash still means nothing.

Those with the most money are the most corrupt.

Probably, Larry and Sergey always regretted putting a landlord in their early-stage business. We no make that mistake.

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How to build ?

✅ Do not abide by patriarchy.

✅ Find and network with people who care.

✅ Acknowledge stolen lands and . [1]

✅ Listen to and include marginalized voices when deciding build or demolish plans.

✅ Involve locally-indigenous people in ongoing ecological assessments, and be willing to pay them with whatever currency they request.

✅ Source and hire locally.

✅ Share good ideas globally.

✅ Expect nothing.[2]

[1] github.com/indie/ecosteader/tr

[2]github.com/indie/ecosteader/tr

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Land acknowledgements, and to honor the by listening to one of the survivors.

"During the American period, Indian female children were sold for $200 pursuant to state indenture laws, while Indian adults were hunted as bounties. The militias were paid 50 cents to $5 per scalp.

In 1860, the California government spent $1.6 million on the hunting of Native Peoples. This would equate to $46,400,000 today. When white men would bring in a scalp, it would drip with blood in order for them to trade for their money. Hence the term redskin, which is the name of Washington, DC’s football team. This term embodies genocide of Native American people, yet the capital city of our country wears it proudly.

The history of California is gruesome and cruel, yet Native American people were able to endure multiple waves of genocide while still cultivating their connection to culture. Native American Peoples’ existence today is resistance in itself.

We were not expected to survive 300 massacres in California and many more across the country. We were told to kill the Indian and save the man by suppressing our ceremonial practices, stories, and languages.

Today we stand stronger than ever as we initiate the movement from symbolism to reality. The history of my ancestors must be respected and learned, because in order to respect the Earth, we must respect Indigenous Peoples.

This history is not a plot for the next blockbuster movie."

bioneers.org/jayden-lim-my-cul

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If any of my ~3:30 AM posts are weird, it is because in meditation, I often meditate on honor in the order of molecules, or on their larger counter parts:

The order of the red-hot mantle atop the core that honors its place in outer space, to stretch out some magnetized poles and produce rotations so that each layer of core and mantle and crust can move and bubble and produce rocks and ash and dirt and flint and chert.

I like the order of spores held close by ferns and lichens and moss which, with the help of the fungi, speed up the return of fallen branches and leaves, decomposition to give the forests that earthy smell with fruiting bodies to feed the sticky snail so he can, in a rip and crack then feed the joyful scrubjay with strength to fly and fill the forest with his talkative calls.

The order of the two Hydrogens paired with the one Oxygen, floating around sometimes tied, sometimes loose, mixing here and there with salt and sand and quenching roots and throats, recycling their dances over and over and tiring not at all.

I am not here to impress anybody. If I followed you, don't take that as an automatic that I endorse your world views. More likely than not, it means I found some goodness of logic in something you wrote in one of your areas of expertise.

Most words have opposites; anarchy is a bad opposite of most good things: it seeks to confuse and distract.

I'm a builder, not a destroyer.

I will always honor order where it orders best in nature, never the fickle, flaky ways of emotional humans and their egotisms and cliques and clubs and pissing contents and hangups and rages and wishful entitlements.

It's better to start the day with an honoring of order and its BFF, accountability.

' ...wildlife managers learned that there is more to conservation than just protecting wildlife. They discovered that nature overproduces its game resources and that good wildlife management yields a surplus that can be harvested by hunters.'

That's not really how it works folks. There's a book I started reading a long time ago but had to return and didn't finish reading called 'Vicious: Wolves and Men in America' I highly suggest reading it but... it is extremely graphic in parts about the methods used against Indigenous populations and wolves.

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Got harassed by Drumpfsters today.

The only flag anyone should be waving is a non-colonial flag. But the settler towns still don't get it.

Did what any Earth-respecting warrior would do: showed them the way to their dead end (they were already standing under that disgusting flagpole) and reminded them they are visitors on Native Land.

In other news... take a peek into the quantum novel:

(On the @indie github _ qmec)

When the kind of world you'd want (your nieces/nephews/progeny/grandkids/etc) to live in doesn't exist, only those truly decolonized from ws media can access ...

We were invited recently to Paul Rollins' anarchist permaculture garden. We dubbed it "anarchist" because it mostly lets the plants decide for themselves how to grow with and around each other. It also doesn't require most of the typical "work" associated with gardening, such as weeding and troweling. It literally uses every space available to produce food. If you live in a place that doesn't get much water, it's great because it doesn't even require watering! It also produces an incredible yield. It can fit a lot of food into even a small space.

Any open yard space or empty lot can do; his is in the front yard of a house he's renting.

Of the many ways to adopt concepts that increase Community Wealth and make an ecostead, this one would be effective for ending food apartheid. (@emsenn probably will enjoy this)

1. Mow down the grass or weeds.

2. Cover the ground with cardboard or several layers of craft paper ... plastic can be used as well. Anything that can hinder undergrowth works.

3. Add a layer of straw. How thick this layer need be depends on many things: one is the amount of rain you get. More rain = more straw. The straw will eventually act like a sponge, helping the garden share and re-circulate the moisture underground.

4. Add a thick layer of compost, or compost / dirt blend. This is where anarchy thrives best, among all the decomposing ruins of a system.

5. Toss a seed blend (cover crop) over the whole thing. Cover with another light layer of straw and compost... water and walk away.

6. (optional) Plant large sunscreen-type crops (sunflowers and corn) near your indoor windows for extra air conditioning power in hot climates.


In case we don't say it enough:
we really do love the Europeans who never left Europe.

An indigenous scientist on CRISPR ethics, genetics, and how to DNA research:

"To decolonize DNA is not anti-science, and it's not a rewriting of the fundamentals of DNA. One thing I always say is that Indigenous peoples are not anti-science; we're anti-exploitation. Science, as much as we like to idealize it, is not purely objective. There’s subjectivity in the types of questions that we choose to pursue, the types of questions our agencies fund. And then also the decisions that we make in terms of who to include and who not to include in studies also creates subjectivity. And also how those results are interpreted. Because if they don't properly take into account all the historical societal factors at play, then we are ignoring some key, potentially colonial factors that relate to health.

Alcoholism is something that's really charged and is an example. There have been over 230-plus publications in PubMed alone that try to look to see why Native Americans are supposedly genetically at greater risk for alcoholism. But then that totally ignores the history of harm that has been perpetrated upon us.

Type 2 diabetes has been heavily studied in Indigenous peoples in the southwest and also in American Samoa. And a huge portion of this narrative for a long period of genetic history has been that we are genetically predisposed to this disease. But this disease didn’t exist in our communities until very recently. So there's these other factors like a forced diet that was imposed upon us; forcible change to our ways of living and our ways of providing food for ourselves; a removal of our lands that doesn't allow us to pursue our traditional forms of agriculture; an imposition of a westernized form of diet. These are like actual contributors of health that are being overly conflated with genetics, when in reality there could be other social, cultural, colonial factors at play."

pbs.org/wgbh/nova/article/bioe

Decolonization requires both the literal and figurative takedown of dudes who brutally murder other humans.. How many stupid and self-righteous tourists are with this guy?

"For about 20 years, thousands of locals and tourists have passed by this statue every day. It has been photographed countless times. Though it is on private land owned by the Garibaldi Maritime Museum, it's seen by all who traverse the Oregon Coast’s main artery.

Gray is widely hailed as the “discoverer” of the Columbia River, though for 12,000 years previous to his arrival, it was one of the most populated regions in North America, home to tens of thousands of members of the Chinook, Clatsop, Multnomah, Clackamas and Cascade nations. Gray is also credited with being the first to circumnavigate the globe in 1790. Many Pacific Northwest geographical features, high schools, scholarships, harbors and roads are named after him.

But, as with many American monuments, there is an untold story.

Gray has been linked to the infamous South Carolina triangle slave trade, having worked for slave traders Crowell Hatch and Samuel Brown. Following the abolition of that horrific trade, Gray outfitted a sailing ship bound for the Pacific Northwest, seeking sea otter furs. By many eyewitness accounts, his dealings with many Pacific Northwest tribes from Vancouver Island to Tillamook Bay was brutal and rife with murder, theft and the torching of villages.

In one well-documented instance, Gray kidnapped the son of the chief of the village of Opitsaht in British Columbia and ordered the entire village of 200 ornately carved ancestral homes burnt to the ground. "

streetroots.org/news/2020/06/2

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The Anishinaabe Nation in Treaty 3 has added an LGBTQ2 council as an integral part of its traditional government in addition to the Youth Council, Elder's Council, Women's Council, and Men's Council.

gct3.ca/grand-council-treaty-3

cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay

Since so much of the West is on fire now, many people are in crisis mode. Found this great doc on how climage change crisises can help us simultaneously DISMANTLE colonial systems, and build something even better.

The sky out there is hazy and some news people are saying that air quality in Oregon is currently worst on planet. Several towns have been almost entirely wiped out, and evacuees in the region are seeking food, clothes, shelter.

This is NOT a time to waste breath talking about money. Landlords and Realtors everywhere should be more generous than they have ever been in their refunds.

(Repost from something that @emsenn linked here a while back... and deleted. illustration by Pete Railand)

mutualaiddisasterrelief.org/wp

Working on my new novel about quantum mechanics. It starts almost at the end with two prequels.

@emsenn I don’t mean “invest” in the sense of a return on capital, I mean invest in the sense of “leftists” need to put our money where our mouths are and find and fund local programs led by the people who bear the majority of the Violence perpetuated by the system.

Taking a weak system and injecting it with toxic anything... actually makes the overall system _weaker_ and less able to recover.

Colonist cash is incredibly weak globally... the other countries are laughing at this crazy nuthouse gov't trying to convince everybody everything is "great" right now and there we have something to be proud about the last 255 years of colonization. From the perspective, there's absolutely nothing about colonization to be proud of, except stopping it and preventing others from being exploited by it.

Read this moring on one of those church-sponsored "genealogy" sites that oh yeah... the war between the British and the French in Wabanaki territory (damn, where is Bashabez when we need him!), which resulted in what's basically the first parcelling of land like colonist spoils. In 1765, 255 years ago.

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Analyze all the charts! Probably, when you've made it your mission to explain eco-sustainability, it sometimes makes sense to also provide an example of something UNSUSTAINABLE.

Newscasters saying something like it has been 120 years since the last big megafire season in Oregon, and this year we have already six megafires. California and Washington have had a rough start of season, too.

Tangentially, the corrupted colonist money system wants the world to think it's doing just great.

Let's watch in awe how devastating the drop will be, as that unsustainable system leans into the burning hot wires... Read the caption for extra analysis of the , further details, etc.

Winds knocked down a teepee-shaped !!! branch today. Gorgeous but large mass that would likely have caught loose end to badly damage or destroy old structure.

not sure who shared this previously, but I just got around to reading this essay about farming cooperatives and it is Really Good, and not just theoretical, because the author is actually starting one: heated.medium.com/small-family

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Ecosteader

Melg'puguasit, we stand with Wet'suwet'en. Decolonize: "Traditional Ecological Knowledge" (TEK) is the only thing that can help humans as a colonized planet continues to sink deeper into the chaos and destruction of broken, inequitable, and faulty systems that value money over Earth's many forms of life. European place names, words and languages and accounting systems don't belong on Turtle Island. . #LivingWalls, not border walls.