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Recycling wood from the rebuild / teardown, turning it from interior base wood to outside finish wood with 焼杉板, or shou tsugi ban.

焼杉板 is technique for wood (usually Cedar or Cypress) that brings out the natural grain and finish. It increases fire resistance and water resistance (makes it last longer from weathering) by charring the wood and rinsing it with water before finishing. Some people say it can extend the life of wood siding up to 80 years! I dunno about that, but it is fun and beautiful. Also get to use a blowtorch to make it, so there's that.

Was half-humorously thinking we should post this to Indigenous Peoples' Day of Rage as an event: "Burning the Rabble of Colonialism" ... whatcha think? ;)

Have too many pieces to do on my own and going to hire some help or recruit volunteers. Yeah Craigslist again.

portland.craigslist.org/wsc/tr

We are delighted that a craigslister took the time out of his day to further illustrate how hateful and angry the white dudes are.

"And why wouldn't the Universe have a built-in mechanism for recycling metal?"

The quivering white man, so afraid. He'd been warned so many times. Nail guns on the disconnected plane, pointed at his brain.

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Ecosteader

This mastodon instance is dedicated to the survival of indigenous languages, plant knowledge, art, and culture outside white supremacist-controlled networks and media promoted on Facebook and Twitter.
Decolonize food. Decolonize medicine. Decolonize housing. Decolonize from corrupt white supremacist networks. Decolonize the US from its oligarchal form of government! European statues, place names, words, languages, and accounting systems DO NOT BELONG on Turtle Island, and are killing the whole planet. "Traditional Ecological Knowledge" (TEK) is the only thing that can help humans as colonial systems continue to sink deeper into broken, inequitable, and faulty systems that value money over Earth's many forms of life. #LivingWalls, not border walls. . Read more... .