Another plant from the hikes w/the niece and nephew last year has been identified.

"From seed, Lilium columbianum requires three to five years to mature."

"Coast Salish, Nuu-chah-nulth and most western Washington peoples steamed, boiled or pit-cooked its bulbs. Bitter or peppery-tasting, they were mostly used as a flavoring, often in soup with meat or fish"

inaturalist.org/observations/3

nuuchahnulth.org/

"The quality of its cloth is prized and valuable, warm, water resistant, long lasting, washable, soft, mothproof, flexible and white. In Polynesia, the loom and weaving of fibers did not occur, possibly because there were no mammals of size to provide hair. Cotton, flax, hemp and silk were not produced.

Wauke grows best in moist areas, along streams, in forests, wherever soil is rich, and where there is protection from the wind. ... Keiki grow from roots of established plants, so the wauke grove extends outwards naturally."[1]

"One ancient legend reveals the story of Maikoha, who after living years with his daughters, became weak and ill. Nearing death, he summoned his daughters and commanded them to carefully obey his instructions: "When I die, bury my body close to the waters of our pleasant stream. A tree will grow from that burial place. This tree will be to you for kapa, from which you will make all things good for clothing as well as covering when you sleep or are ill. The bark of this tree is the part you will use."

After Maikoha died, his daughters dutifully carried out his bidding and a new plant, such as they had never seen before, with small spreading branches, grew at his burial site. It was the wauke tree.

The daughters believed it was a gift from the 'aumakua, or spirits of ancestors. Reverently, they removed some branches, stripped off the bark and pounded the pieces until they were meshed into a crude type of cloth. Thus they made kapa, "the beaten thing.""[2]

[1]canoeplants.com/wauke.html

[2]the.honoluluadvertiser.com/art

yumpu.com/en/document/read/400

collections.tepapa.govt.nz/obj

inaturalist.org/observations/3

The Cherokee nation is offering heirloom to tribal citizens interested in growing traditional crops.

"Last year, the Cherokee Nation gave away almost 10,000 packages of seeds to its tribal citizens. Cherokee Nation officials are committed to this program because it helps to keep the Cherokee culture and history alive.

This year’s offering of heirloom seeds includes Cherokee Colored Corn, Trail of Tears Beans, Georgia Candy Roaster Squash, a variety of gourds, Indian corn beads and Native plants such as the American Basket Flower, Jewelweed and Wild Senna"

nativenewsonline.net/currents/

webapps.cherokee.org/SeedBank/

Noticed an invasive species (Scotch broom) was overtaking a patch of wild ginger (first photo) on a hike recently.

Removed the invaders and gave the patch some breathing room.

English ivy is another invasive that tries to crowd out this delicate plant, especially in more metro areas of Portland. There's a metro-wide campaign called "No Ivy League" that targets cleaning up this messy invader, which does not belong among Portland's humble roots.

The second little tree has glossy, flat needles; I don't know what kind of tree it is yet.

The invasive species identification thanks to some and preservation from indigenous Atfalat'i and Kalapuya peoples of the .

invasive.org/gist/moredocs/cyt

portlandoregon.gov/parks/47820

"Indigenous worldviews, on the other hand, are based on concepts we sometimes refer to as the four R’s: relationality, reciprocity, respect, and responsibility. In a world based on relationships, all life is seen in terms of kinship (we often refer to this paradigm as β€œkincentrism”). This is a non-hierarchical orientation to the world in which other life-forms are relations who have agency.

In a world of relationships, all beings are bound by reciprocity and responsibility based on respect. Since time immemorial, these principles ensured viable, diverse communities of humans and their nonhuman relations, and are what made Indigenous North American societies inherently sustainable."

From Florida through deserts and mountains to Alaska's once frozen wilderness, so much diversity in plants, Allies, tribes (Anthemideae) Tribes, etc.

inaturalist.org/observations/2

beaconbroadside.com/broadside/


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